The Negotiator Magazine

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Then, Karpov adds the key point that is lost so often in negotiation literature. The chess game is not a model for negotiation "because in chess the pieces always start from the same positions. Consequently, each player's chance of winning are more or less the same. His skill and ability will make the difference. In the real world, however, it is extremely rare to find a balanced starting situation where the chances of winning for both parties are about equal"(p.8). If for no other reason than this clarifying distinction between negotiation and games/wars, this work is invaluable.

In addition, you will find material on the importance of preparation and a lengthy discussion of three approaches to negotiation (the direct or frontal approach; the indirect or oblique approach; and the lateral approach) with recommendations on their values, strengths and weaknesses.

Certainly, recommended for the chess player-negotiator and of interest to negotiators in general. Includes a closing Notes section of carefully annotated sources which will be of interest to any reader.

Recommended.

John D. Baker, Ph.D.
Editor

As a service to our readers, you may order this month's Reader's Review selection by clicking on the appropriate icon below:


Chess & The Art of Negotiation [Amazon.com]



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Chess & The Art of Negotiation [Amazon.ca]


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July 2007