The Negotiator Magazine

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  1. Increased Speech Errors

            Many persons who try to deceive others have a greater number of speech errors. They may stutter, repeat phrases, or trail off without finishing their statements. They may also include nonsubstantive modifiers like “you know” or “don’t you think.” It is as if their conscience is disrupting the communication between their brain and their mouth to prevent the prevarication.

  1. More Frequent Clearing of Throat

             The tension associated with lying may cause speakers to engage in more throat clearing. As they prepare to utter their false statements, they nervously clear their throats.

            If after reading this you go home and ask your spouse or significant other if he/she loves you and that person increases or decreases their gross body movement, places their hand over their mouth, blinks more rapidly, speaks with an elevated voice pitch, and speaks more deliberately or more rapidly, your relationship is probably in deep trouble!

 

Charles B. Craver is the Freda H. Alverson Professor at the George Washington University Law School. He is the author of Effective Legal Negotiation and Settlement (5th ed. 2005 LEXIS) and The Intelligent Negotiator (2002 Prima/Crown), and coauthor of Alternative Dispute Resolution: The Advocate’s Perspective (3rd ed. 2006 LEXIS). Over the past thirty years, he has taught negotiation skills to over 75,000 attorneys throughout the United States and in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Austria, England, Germany, and China. He can be reached at ccraver@law.gwu.edu

 

 

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April 2007