The Negotiator Magazine

Back to Index

prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 next
download printable version (Word DOC)

S is for Salami

Matyas Rakosis, one-time head of the Hungarian Communist party is credited with this definition of the "salami" technique at the end of power negotiations. "When you want to get hold of a salami sausage which your opponents are strenuously defending, you must not grab at it. You must start by carving yourself a very thin slice. The owner of the salami will hardly notice or, if he does, not mind very much. The next day you will carve another slice, then still another. And so, little by little, the salami will pass into your possession."

T is for Tentative Overtures

You can make tentative overtures to the other side to inch your way forward out of deadlocked negotiating positions. Here are three ways to do it:

U is for Uncertainty

Natural negotiators are comfortable with uncertainty, while those who fear the process aren’t. Samfrits Le Poole in his book “Never Take No For An Answer” recalls a deal he made to buy a small plane. He got it for the ridiculously low price of $14,500. After the negotiations, he asked the seller why he had sold for such a low price. The man admitted that he found the whole negotiating process uncomfortable because of the uncertainty. He was wracked with questions such as “What if I don’t get another buyer?” and “What if nobody else comes forward?” As a result, he settled at the first offer simply because he couldn’t stand the uncertainty involved.

prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 next
Back to Index


July 2006