The Negotiator Magazine

Back to Index

prev 1 2
download printable version (MS Word .doc)

You may ask, does this apply to the real world? One of my clients, a software company, was curious if the money they spent on my fee was worth it. They decided on a little experiment. They tracked the average selling price of their products before and after I trained their sales force. This is what my client found out: Before I showed up, the salespeople were caving in to customer demands right and left. Profits were hurting. In the year after I taught them the correct way to negotiate a sale, the company's average sale went up by an extraordinary 59 percent!

The way you negotiate really does matter. A good negotiator can be responsible for as much as a 100 percent difference in the outcome of a deal. This is clearly the most eye-opening nugget of wisdom I have acquired in twenty years of teaching people how to negotiate. The consistent evidence suggests that a perfect outcome is nonexistent. Every deal must rise or fall based upon the behavior of the parties. These factors will influence the outcome of your negotiation: Your ability to read the other side's situation; how you manage the other side's expectations; where you open and how you make concessions; the point at which you decide to agree.

Every negotiation is unique. Any given pair of negotiators will arrive at a one-of-a-kind agreement. The elements may differ: personalities, time pressure, exigencies of the situation, etc. The one element that you have the most control over, and which can have the greatest impact on the outcome, is your negotiating ability.


Ed Brodow is a motivational speaker and negotiation guru on PBS, Fox News, and Inside Edition. He is the author of Beating the Success Trap and Negotiate With Confidence. This article is excerpted from his new book entitled Negotiation Boot Camp which will be published by Doubleday in 2006. For more information on his keynotes and seminars, call 831-372-7270, e-mail ed@brodow.com and visit his web site at NegotiationBootCamp.com

prev 1 2
Back to Index


April 2006