The Negotiator Magazine

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We, as individuals living in a world ruled by financial bottom lines, must learn to set aside our assumptions of how media, money and politics are related and adapt ourselves in order to even attempt to compete on the same field, for example, as gargantuan corporate adversaries. I lament that our society is so easily entertained by such a specter, justifying the investment in sensationalism by media empires and largely eliminating any real chance of dialog apart from sound bytes. But, let us be grateful that in America there at least exists a possibility of being heard -- even though you may have to create your own forum.

If you are the only one affected by an unjust situation and worry you won't be able to generate sufficient media attention, don't fret. You may be able to win local and possibly even national attention through the use of two helpful techniques. One of these techniques is to demonstrate how your situation and harm may come to likewise involve others, due to current policy or trend, if a clamorous public uproar (and hopefully subsequent policy change) isn't heard soon. The second way is to compare and leverage your situation against a relevant and current hot topic or trend. This second technique helps to correlate current public interest and economically expand subject selection for a media outlet. Building up media attention is a slow process usually begun at a local level. Broader exposure through multiple media channels, such as radio, television and print, gains momentum over time through diligent updates to your press connections.

Beyond managing the interview, here are some additional important and central techniques for success in working with media:

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February 2006