The Negotiator Magazine

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Of course, disadvantages also exist to going public, the most significant of which include: 1) the increased competitiveness often associated with public battles; 2) the decreased flexibility that occurs once positions have been publicly taken; and 3) an inability to control how the media characterizes your position and the possible miscommunication that might thus occur.

So next time you read about a negotiation in the newspaper, consider why the parties are duking it out in public. It just might help you keep the peace in your future negotiations.

Marty Latz

Marty Latz, a negotiation columnist for The Business Journal of Phoenix where this column originally appeared, is President of Latz Negotiation Institute, a national negotiation training and consulting firm based in Phoenix, Arizona. He has developed and taught negotiation training programs and seminars for corporations, cities, bar associations and law firms nationwide. Participants at his courses leave behind the intuitive and instinctive -- along with their inherent uncertainties -- and develop the strategic mindset that’s at the heart of successful negotiation.

A Harvard Law honors graduate, Marty is also an Adjunct Professor-Negotiation at Arizona State University College of Law. He also negotiated for the White House nationally and internationally on the White House Advance Teams. Marty is the author of Gain the Edge! Negotiating to Get What You Want (St. Martin’s Press, 2004). For more and for previous columns, see www.NegotiationInstitute.com or email Marty at Latz@NegotiationInstitute.com.

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