The Negotiator Magazine

Back to Index

Prev  1  2  3  4  Next
download printable version

And in some mergers and acquisitions, the ultimate decision-maker may be a public company's shareholders. One effective way to influence their behavior is through the media.

2. The public may perceive one party as more "fair."

Many companies and individuals place a substantial value on their reputation and how the public and their colleagues perceive them. Winning the public relations battle in a negotiation thus can have a substantial impact on their ability to achieve success not only in the negotiation, but also in other contexts where their reputation matters.

For instance, the National Hockey League's collective bargaining agreement expires Sept. 15. Both the NHL and the players' union already are at work trying to influence the public's -- especially hockey fans' -- perception of the fairness of their positions.

Why? Both sides' success depends in part on their ability to satisfy the public's interests. If a player has great skills, a good reputation and can put fans in the seats, he has more value to a team. If the team or the league turns off its fan base by seeming to take a greedy stand in the negotiation, it may "win" the negotiation but lose its fans.

Negotiation with governmental entities -- such as cities -- also involves this element. After all, elected officials constantly worry about how the public perceives them. Evaluate this when you see police and other public employee unions going public.

This element, of course, is the ultimate in peer pressure.

Prev  1  2  3  4  Next

Back to Index