The Negotiator Magazine

Back to Index

prev  1  2  3  4  5  6 next

download printable version

Remember the retail chain that had structured their line of appliances so the salesperson could sell down, off the most expensive one? They'd really structured the profit margins so they made more profit on the middle of the line, than they did on the high end. Not only were they making more money that way, they were building a powerful plus. The salespeople gained so much credibility doing it, that when they recommended the service contract-one of their most profitable items-they met with very little resistance.

CREDIBILITY TIP 5: USE PRECISE NUMBERS

People believe precise numbers more than they believe rounded numbers. The Ivory Soap people figured this out decades ago when they started claiming "Ivory Soap is 99.44 percent pure." Obviously we wouldn't challenge them if they told us that Ivory Soap was 100 percent pure; but the precise figure is subliminally more believable.

We assume that somebody had gone to a lot of work to figure out that the soap wasn't 99.43 percent pure, or 99.45 percent pure. Why bother to say that Taster's Choice Decaffeinated Coffee is "99.7 percent" caffeine free. They could probably get away with simply saying, "Caffeine free." The reason is that we believe specific numbers far more than we believe rounded numbers.

We can use the believability of the odd figure syndrome as a persuasion technique. Let's say you're buying a piece of property. They're asking $220,000. If you offer $200,00, it doesn't sound as firm a figure as if you say this: "We've done a thorough research on the property, and after running all the numbers, we feel that a fair price would be $198,700." Studies have shown that when you take that approach, the seller will respond with a counter offer that is, on average, $4722 less than if you start at $200,000. No! I have no idea what the real number is, but it sure sounds more believable, doesn't it?

prev  1  2  3  4  5  6 next

Back to Index